Tag Archives: Ignorance

Ted Cruz is a politician (and a hypocrite)

Republican senator and presidential candidate, Ted Cruz, leapt immediately to the podium in order to command the President to get off his butt and send the Cruz man’s home state, Texas, some disaster relief following devastating floods.

Hypocrite Ted Cruz Begs For Federal Relief Money For Houston Flooding

Ted Cruz, the same Tea Party Senator that voted against aid for victims of Hurricane Sandy because it was “wasteful“, shows off his astonishing hypocrisy by announcing that he will work with Democrats to “stand as one in support of the federal government meeting its statutory obligations.

As noted in the linked piece, when Congress was appropriating funds for FEMA following the Sandy disaster, Cruz demanded cuts in other federal funding must come before spending money on those Yankees.

An article in the NYTimes, noted that the extent of damage due to the Texas flooding could have been mitigated if Texas had followed standard building practices found in other states.

The main challenge to rational planning for flood risk in the country is that private property rights trump even modest limitations on floodplain development,” said Nicholas Pinter, an expert on floods, people and politics at Southern Illinois University, in an email today. “And that sentiment runs deep in Texas. The result is unchecked construction on flood-prone land, up to the present day and in some places even accelerating.”

And now Texans are suffering the consequences of their political choices. I am not gloating over their tragedy but we must understand that hating on governmental regulations does not always provide for a better future.

As Andrew Rivkin writes:

It’s important to get these studies done, but I doubt they’ll have much impact as long as politicians and communities in the region stick with the go-go development mentality that has been so vividly on display.

I see little evidence that leaders in the region have paid attention to the vast volumes of information they already paid for. The websites of Texas agencies responsible for managing water and limiting disaster losses are already full of valuable information clearly laying out the deep hydrological vulnerability in the state.

It is very likely that some of the Texans who were recently ranting about the military’s Jade Helm exercise being little more than a prelude to the secret Muslim Marxist declaring a new socialist kingdom in America, are now among those begging for federal assistance.

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Paranoia runs deep in the minds of GOP creeps

A blog post by Jason Easley at politicususa.com, with links to a Boston Globe column, nicely illuminates the craziness level upon which too many Americans now reside.

As the rest of the nation looks on in disbelief at the level of crazy among some Republicans in Texas, it needs to be understood that the insanity over Jade Helm is not unique to Texas. The Republican Party has been gripped by paranoia. Republicans are paranoid, and they elect candidates who legitimize and indulge their taste for conspiracies.

This dynamic is why House Republicans investigated the IRS. It is also why the nation is suffering its eighth investigation into Benghazi. Republicans benefit by playing to the paranoia.

What Jade Helm teaches us all is that Republican fear of the nation’s first black president is getting stronger even though his time in office is winding down.

The question I have: How much of this paranoia, this increased crazification, is a result of propaganda? Lies emanating from right-wing think tanks and various media outlets – I’m thinking of you Roger Ailes

Free speech for some but not for teachers in NC

The North Carolina senate has a bill before it which would punish teachers if they wear red clothes in their classrooms. Say WHAA!!??!!

Though not explicitly banning red clothes, a teacher wearing red to school might be seen as engaging in a “political activity”… There is a campaign in North Carolina, Wear Red 4 Ed (public education)

What has created “the notion that promoting public education has become a political statement.”?

What else but a well-funded campaign from the right. There is some justification for vouchers which allow public school students to attend private schools but there is also the reality that some folks see vouchers as a money-making proposition — and screw the kids.

h/t to Crooks&Liars

Charles P Pierce has a way with words

Writing about Marco Rubio’s efforts to justify the type of domestic spying exposed by some guy named Edward Snowden and the attempts by America’s intelligence community to cover its failures in 2001, Mr Pierce says the following:

It is now customary for ambitious politicians to presume the American electorate has the attention span of a sand flea. However, there never has been a more important time for that not to be the case.

I really wish I could write as well as Mr Pierce

More can be read at Old Spy’s Tale: A 9/11 Fable Lives Again

Santorum: I Don’t Believe In Separation Of Church And State

Everyday Mr Santorum opens his mouth and shows us all, yet once again, his desire for a theocracy in America

Santorum: I Don’t Believe In Absolute Separation Of Church And State

Rick Santorum on Sunday took on separation of church and state.

“I don’t believe in an America where the separation of church and state are absolute,” he told ‘This Week’ host George Stephanopoulos. “The idea that the church can have no influence or no involvement in the operation of the state is absolutely antithetical to the objectives and vision of our country…to say that people of faith have no role in the public square? You bet that makes me want to throw up.”

The GOP candidate was responding to comments he made last October. He had said that he “almost threw up” after reading JFK’s 1960 speech in which he declared his commitment to the separation of church and state.

Santorum also on Sunday told Meet The Press host David Gregory that separation of church and state was “not the founders’ vision.”

The GOP candidate has been doubling down on religious rhetoric in an effort to court evangelical voters ahead of Super Tuesday. Last week, he questioned Obama’s spiritual beliefs.

“[Obama believes in] some phony ideal, some phony theology … not a theology based on the Bible, a different theology,” he said.

We also have evidence of some of his other ‘thoughts’ in various speeches he has made and in the book that was published in 2005, It Takes a Family. Rick’s beliefs about a woman’s place in society are outlined in an op-ed piece on CNN.com, titled Santorum’s stone-age view of women and then there was the speech at Florida’s own Ave Maria College in 2008 in which Santorum said “Protestants Are ‘Gone From The World Of Christianity’”

Yet once again, a True Believer(tm) lays down the “No True Scotsman” argument. Simply another fine example of the mindset found in the modern conservative (‘conservative’, as defined by the modern American right – not the classic definition). The more they ‘know’, the less likely they are to accept new knowledge.

Chris Mooney writing at Alternet, pointed out the problem we face as rational beings with those who ‘know’ they are correct – also right in the political sense of ‘right’

Indeed, the rapidly growing social scientific literature on the resistance to global warming (see for examples here and here) says so pretty unequivocally. Again and again, Republicans or conservatives who say they know more about the topic, or are more educated, are shown to be more in denial, and often more sure of themselves as well—and are confident they don’t need any more information on the issue.

Although he was writing about the denial of the science that supports the theory of mankind being behind climate change, the studies referenced also reveal the seemingly innate tendency of the conservative mind to reject facts which don’t fit the ‘reality’ it has created.  So we have individuals with university degrees denying the science behind global warming, asserting that evolution is some kind of atheist plot and creating their own history of America.

Way back in the “good ol’ days”, some clueless, God-hater wrote the following:

Religion & Govt. will both exist in greater purity, the less they are mixed together.
James Madison (1822)
I wonder what Santorum would say to that guy.

GOP Debate Audience boos Birth Control Question

Debate Audience Boos Birth Control

Mitt Romney’s not ready to give up his status as frontrunner just yet. Romney denied that his health-care plan ever mandated contraception in a feisty exchange with Rick Santorum. Earlier, moderator John King raised the question of birth control—eliciting boos from the audience. Meanwhile, the candidates were frothing at the mouth. Newt Gingrich immediately lashed out at King, demanding why moderators never asked President Obama about his vote as an Illinois senator for “infanticide.” He then called Obama a baby killer and said he was more of an extremist than any of the GOP candidates. Romney chimed in to say there’s never been an administration in America more opposed to religious freedom. Santorum argued that teen sexuality should be a reason why contraception shouldn’t be free, and then shifted his focus to defunding Planned Parenthood and fractured families.

Seriously Newt – “infanticide”? Oooh, I know where he got that one. The question was about “birth control” – Don’t these clowns know that making contraception more readily available will result in less “infanticide” or as most rational folks say – abortions. Of course they know the facts but they are playing to the 27 percenters, otherwise known as the Republican “base”.

None of the candidates actually bothered to try and answer John King’s question and in fact used it as a basis for attacking the media (cheers from audience) and to kick off rants about “religious freedom” and the decline in moral values that they see as the reason for discontent in America.

Romney and the rest continue to rage on and on about Obama’s suppression of religious freedom. Doesn’t “religious freedom” include those who don’t hold to the same myths as the majority believe? Although some would think “religious freedom” means you can believe and worship and behave as you wish, as long as you cause no harm to others, there appears to be a large segment of the Republican base which sees it as them being allowed to impose their views on everyone else. When they can’t control society, they see it as “suppression” of their beliefs. When they don’t receive government support for their ideology (and xmas displays) they see an assault on religion.

Naturally, the theocrats have managed to reveal their true desires in a book promoted by Glenn Beck, who managed to drive the sales into best-seller numbers, The Five Thousand Year Leap. It is the arrogance engendered by their belief in the ‘rightness’ of their theology that is driving today’s assault not only on women but also on minority religious beliefs and atheists. Many, far too many, Americans believe stuff that just ain’t true and support those who promote such lies and fantasies. The end result of such twisted thinking was well described in the dystopias of Heinlein’s Revolt in 2100 and Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale.

more on the drive for xian control of America may be found in the books of Frank Schaeffer and Jeff Sharlet’s The Family

All religions are equally sublime to the ignorant, useful to the politician, and ridiculous to the philosopher. – Lucretius (94 BC – 49 BC)

Gingrich targets NASCAR voters

Gingrich Targets NASCAR Voters

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Newt Gingrich is wooing NASCAR voters.

As he charts a possible course to the Republican nomination, aides say Gingrich will paint frontrunner Mitt Romney as the candidate of the PGA golf tour while the former House speaker pursues the blue collar mantle of Dale Earnhardt.

It’s a strategy that exploits the class warfare Gingrich professes to oppose. Still, it could pay dividends once the GOP race again swings South. Gingrich sees delegate-rich Texas as a firewall in April. But he must slog through more than 30 contests before that.
(…)
Still, even as the former Georgia congressman casts himself as a national candidate, noting that he’ll head to California next week, it is the South — with its evangelicals and social conservatives — that could prove pivotal.

“We want to get to Georgia, to Alabama, to Tennessee. We want to get to Texas,” Gingrich said Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

He failed to mention Virginia, the state he now calls home, and where he failed to qualify to get on the ballot. The error is costly. It means he won’t be eligible for any of the state’s 46 delegates.

Kind of a silly headline actually, but it is what it is – NASCAR is not an exclusively southern sport, although many of the ‘media elite’ seem t0 think so.  The ‘tell’ for the Gingrich campaign and its certain collapse was the failure to get on the ballot in Virginia – bad management I would say and not a good recommendation for a man who wants to run the most powerful nation on this planet.

Do you think he messed up getting the signatures to appear on the VA ballot because Callista insisted on that Mediterranean cruise about that time?  You know – the cruise that caused many of his campaign professionals to pack their bags and go elsewhere.